5 African Films to Watch Out For, N°18

Taking cues from the Belgian Africa Film Festival programme (which kicks off on March 15, running until March 30), here are 5 more films to watch out for. Below is the trailer for documentary maker Thierry Michell’s portrait of Congolese businessman-governor-football club owner Moïse Katumbi Chapwe. Michell’s relentless dedication to all things Congo is quite impressive. Remember for example his Mobutu King of Zaire, Congo River, Katanga Business, or the recent documentary on the murder of human rights activist Floribert Chebeya (which landed him in trouble). For a fairly complete list of his other work, see hereMoïse Katumbi: Foot, Business, Politique seems to suggest Katumbi might become the DRC’s next president.

Next is The Teacher’s Country, a film by Benjamin Leers about home and belonging in Tanzania, 50 years after its independence. One of the characters followed and interviewed in the documentary is Tanzania’s first President Julius Nyerere’s son Madaraka (who’s a prolific blogger, by the way):

There’s the short film Nota Bene by Rwandan director Richard Mugwaneza, tracing a boy’s move from his village to the city. Actors include Rodrigues Cyuzuzo and Jean Pierre Harerimana. The film’s website has a detailed write-up about the production of the project.

C’est à dieu qu’il faut le dire (God’s the one to tell) is an older short film by Elsa Diringer (2010, 19min.) but I haven’t seen it screened in many places since it came out. Set in Paris, the lead role is played by Tatiana Rojo (Côte d’Ivoire).

And Pourquoi Moi? (Why Me?) is a short fim by Burundian director Vénuste Maronko, tackling violence against women. The dramatic and experimental film is available in full on YouTube (below) — not of the best quality but that might be partially explained by its home cinema “of the 1950s with a 8 mm camera” aesthetics:

* All films will be screened at the Africa Film Festival. Look out for their selection of other Burundian short fims.

 

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